Beautiful, Bountiful Chard

Dehydrating experts recommend using produce that’s in season, fresh & bountiful. In my garden this summer, that produce is chard. So of course I’ve been putting it into backpacking meals now that I’ve finally started dehydrating for this summer’s Sierra excertion.

While chard is not high in calories or protein (7 & 1g per cup, respectively), it packs a real
nutritional wallop:

“… a good source of Thiamin, Folate and Zinc, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.”

Chard is an especially potent source of Vitaman A, offering up 44% of the RDA in one cup! Most of us are in no great danger of a Vitamin A defiency, but still, there’s something comforting about eating delicious leafy veg that not only promotes healthy vision, but may also, as the Mayo Clinic states, “prevent some types of cancer, aid in growth and development, and improve immune function.”

A cuppa chard also provides 77g of sodium, which adds to its tastiness quota and is never amiss on the trail, at least, where we are generally sweating out all the salt we consume.

And chard is so visually attractive! That vibrant green leaf ribbed in red, gold or white! I’ve been chopping up raw chard to add to the pre-cooked Tasty Bites* and noticing how much more appealing the fresh veg is than the pre-cooked meal from the foil pouch.

While appreciating the bright green, however, I couldn’t help but ask myself: “What will dehydrating do to all this Vit A?”

Nothing. apparently, as long as the product is kept out of the sunlight:

“Vitamin A is retained during the drying process. Because vitamin A is light sensitive, foods that contain it-like carrots, bell peppers, mangoes-should be stored in a dark place.”

The same site points out that “Minerals … such as potassium, sodium, magnesium, and so on–are also not altered when [produce] is dried.” So we don’t lose the mineral load of chard on the trail.

Some vitamin C, most of us realize, is lost in the dehydration process, but that’s easily remedied by imbibing a daily dose of fizzy flavored EmergenC in your choice of fruit flavors.

My next dehydrating adventure with chard is going to involve chicken stock, polenta, black-eyed peas with oregeno & lemon. I’ll keep you posted!

*More on That: To veg-up the flavorful & convenient Tasty Meals, I use 1 lb of fresh veg to 2 packs of Tasty Bites. With the addition of a dried grain, this makes 2 meals for 2 people, or a total of 4 individual meals. I do not use all chard. The combination so far is 1/3 each by weight of peas, green beans & chard. I use frozen peas & green beans for convenience; all the veg is put into the food processor & chopped into smaller bits for future ease of hydration. The green peas & beans add protein, especially important this year as we are going to be back-packing vegetarians … well, except for the half-pound of “emergency” hand-made fennel sausage (finocchiona) we picked up in San Diego’s Little Italy farmers market this spring.

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