Tag Archives: Rebar

Tuolumne Meadows to Red’s & Back Again

Just got back from the post office, where I posted a food box off to Red’s Meadow. Seven days’ worth of lovingly dehydrated vegetarian meals, hand-mixed gorp with local raw almonds, the world-famous dodie kakes, 2 kinds of food bars (Rebar & the Active Greens), pease porridge — all the usual, with the exception of dried shrimp in the Indian meals & our standby homemade beef jerkey. Mr. Jack wanted to try a vegetarian backpack for a change — well, except for the 4.6 oz of secchi salami we’ll devour within days of opening the re-supply box.

But there’s something odd about the food I’ve prepared & gathered for this relatively short 14-day backpack.

The food doesn’t weigh as much as it should. It looks like the right amount. It feels like the right amount. All the meals individually seem to weigh about as much as they did last year and although we subtracted the 2 oz of jerky per day, we put 2 oz of some divine olive-oil-roasted & salted almonds right back in. But when I entered all the weights into the spreadsheet & divided out per person per day, I only got 1.08 lbs.

You know that’s not right. Last year we had 1.24 lbs per person & turned out we were a little short. Well, it was cold. This year we have a cozier tent and a heavier quilt. Our days won’t be as long, either, since we are going to try the High Route on the return leg, going mostly cross-country. But we are going to be crossing some snowy passes–I will, in fact, be carrying an ice ax and crampons for the first time in my life–and the ranger Mr. Jack conferred with on the phone mentioned low temperatures in the 20s. That’s cold enough for me to be glad of the improved sleeping situation!

The food puzzle is that I’m not sure where we lost that average 4 oz per day: Are the meals marginally smaller? Did I skimp when measuring out ingredients for the pease porridge? Is the gorp lighter? And the big question: Will we starve this time?

We’re heading up to Tuolumne to pick up our permits when the office opens early Saturday morning. By the time we get to Red’s Meadow we hope to have a clearer understanding of our food situation. At that point, if we need more food, we can raid the food boxes! (Assuming anything there we can eat! If you’ve been in the boxes yourself, you can understand my hesitation about relying on instant oatmeal for much nourishment …)

I keep thinking I’ve just done the math wrong, or written down a wrong weight, but if that is indeed the case, I’ve not been able to find it. I admit I’m tempted to throw another tube of almond butter into the bear bag and if there’s room when we get ourselves all packed up, I just might …

On the other hand, it’s only 15 days of not very strenous hiking, so it’s unlikely anything worse than the hungries will happen, even if we are a bit short on food. And we have plenty of tea even if we don’t have squeeze bacon!

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Green Food Bars: Easy Veggies on the Trail

Although I planned to comment on the bins of abandoned backpacking food donated by JMT thru-hikers at the re-supply sites of Red’s Meadow, Vermillion andMuir Ranch, that must wait. Because today I grocery shopped for the first time since coming home (how grateful we are for the abundant garden!) & discovered a “new” food bar at the Davis Food Co-op. Yes, I’ve since discovered that the Organic Food Bar company started in 2001, but I have missed out! I bought the Active Green version & ate it in the grocery aisle, pleased with the fresh flavor & chewy texture and not at all adverse to the dark green color. I bet it would take even better while actually backpacking!

OFB Active Green tastes remarkably like our longtime favorite food bar, Rebar, a bar made entirely & completely of raw, organic fruits & veggies. Nothing else added. While OFB is also a green bar, it includes some seeds, nuts and sprouts, as well as agave nectar (3d ingredient in the list). Rebar also makes a nut/seed bar, but since it contains soy, we haven’t been able to add it to our repertoire.

Both of these bars are free of gluten, soy, dairy & egg.

The bars have similar amounts of carbohydrates (38/34), sugars (20/22) & fiber (7/6). OFB, however, provides 10 extra grams of protein (12) with the added bonus of 13 g of fat to Rebar’s none, thanks to the almond butter listed as the first ingredient. OFB is also a bigger bar at 68 grams to Rebar’s 50.

The calories/ounce ratio (important to consider when planning one’s backpacking menu) looks like this:

  • OFB = 125 calories per oz
  • RB = 91.4 calories per oz

Since getting the “hungries” on the JMT trip (more on that another day), I’m interested in adding more fat to my food. Whether the OFB is the answer, or whether I’d be just as well off to throw another handful of nuts into my gorp and keep eating the 8-servings-of-veggies Rebar, is a question to explore. Wonder how many servings of veggies the OFB contains with all those sprouts?

After all, fat is easy to add on a backpack (nuts, anyone?). Fresh veggies on the trail? Not so much.